Touring through the best Italian wines

Posted: October 04, 2018 | Word Count: 466
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Dreaming of an Italian vacation? You can experience the country's ancient, romantic regions without even leaving home. The wines of Italy embody the heart and soul of the regions in which they're grown.

Letting the vineyards be your guide, travel from the Tuscan coast to the Adriatic's sandy beaches, to the black, rich slopes of an active volcano. Marvel at Sicily's crystal blue waters and Campania's storied past. You can even learn about some dedicated winemakers along the way.

Invite your friends for a wine tasting, open up these Italian whites, and enjoy their not-commonly-known varieties accompanied by light, Italian fare.

Ca'Marcanda Vistamare: The playful name of this wine, which means "sea view," was inspired by the Tyrrhenian sea breeze, the sun and the cheerful, lighthearted outlook of the Tuscan coast. Coastal innkeepers would use "vistamare" to entice hotel guests, even if their rooms only offered a limited Mediterranean view. The vineyards used for Vistamare enjoy a panoramic view, and their grapes are gently touched by the salt air and brilliant colors of the Tuscan sea.

Terlato Vineyards Colli Orientali del Friuli Friulano: Travel to Northern Italy's Friuli region, where mountains overlook the Adriatic Sea, its coastline dotted with lagoons. Friulano is the predominant wine here because of the ideal growing conditions. This Friulano comes from very old vines on estate vineyards at 1,050 feet above sea level, with cool nights and warm days, ideal for producing wines with excellent acidity and elegance.

Anselmi San Vincenzo: Grown in the Monteforte area within the Veneto region, San Vincenzo vines are planted on 110 acres of volcanic tuff and limestone. Veneto is encircled by Lake Garda, the Dolomite Mountains and the Adriatic Sea. Imagine floating down the Grand Canal in Venice before finding a cafe where you can sip this delicious wine of the region.

Alta Mora Etna Bianco: Travel south to Sicily, the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, where these grapes are grown and harvested on the slopes of the active volcano, Mount Etna. The soil is black, fertile and dynamic, and the name Alta Mora translates to “tall, black,” representing the great heights of the vineyards on the mountain and the dark, black volcanic soil. This wine is a slight nod to Sauvignon Blanc in style.

Feudi di San Gregorio Falanghina: This vineyard is in Sorbo Serpico, a tiny village in Campania’s Irpinia region, near Mount Vesuvius. The area, with its numerous castles and fortresses, has ancient roots, and has been a transit land between the Tyrrhenian and Adriatic seas. Named after the method of vine cultivation in Sannio at the end of the Roman Era called Falangs (“poles”), this Falanghina is ideal as an aperitif. It can also accompany appetizers, plates of simple fish and vegetables as well as fresh cheeses.

Let these wines bring the beauty of Italy to your table.

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